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Career Profile | Larissa Vázquez Zapata, Editor of GFR Media's Magacín

CareerMaría Elena Rodríguez2 Comments

If you live in Puerto Rico, there's no way you haven't heard that El Nuevo Día is the biggest media outlet and news publication in the Island. As part of GFR Media, this daily newspaper has gained the respect of almost everyone in Puerto Rico for being the most complete in every aspect and being able to evolve with its audience through decades and regardless of harsh economic situations. 

A photo posted by @magacin on

I remember when I was in high school I loved receiving El Nuevo Día's Sunday edition because it had so many interesting articles and special segments, but most importantly, I could read Magacín, their lifestyle section. As an avid magazine reader as a teenager (my favorites where Revista Tú, Seventeen and Cosmo Girl), Magacín felt like a more grown up and sophisticated version of what I was used to reading. Since I was so consumed in Mexican and American magazines, Magacín helped me stay on track of the lifestyle trends in Puerto Rico. But I have to admit, as embarrassing as it sounds, that I loved looking at all the fancy people at extravagant events and imagining myself in their shoes, which were probably Manolos and Jimmy Choos. *sighs* 

Then I started working in the communications industry and noticing the bylines so of course, that's when I started to admire Larissa Vázquez Zapata who has been the Editor at Magacín for the past 8 years. She was the person in charge of making the first digital portal for the publication and is currently in charge of their social media outlet at the same time she manages a team of Lifestyle journalists. And did I mention she has traveled all over the world for this job? Can we say #DreamJob?! 

So needless to say, Larissa has been in my interview bucket list ever since I started this Career Profile series a year ago. I am truly honored that she took the time to answer these questions and hopefully this will help you get to know the life of a super rad Puerto Rican Editor. So without further ado, and great pleasure, I present you with Larissa Vázquez Zapata's Career Profile:

ME: When you were a little girl, what did you wanted to do when you grow up?

Larissa at a Magacín photoshoot. (Photo Cred: magacin.com)

LVZ: The story is a little long, I warn you. When I was a little girl I started to write on every wall I could find, something that my mother didn’t like very much since during this time, mid 70’s, most middle class homes had wall paper and my home was no exception. That’s how I figured a way to practice my calligraphy skills over a bone white moiré wall paper that soon started to show “Bic blue” stains. So after my mom convinced me not to write on the living room’s walls, I moved to my grandma’s room. I started using white chalk to write on her wooden closet doors. Needless to say, I messed them up as well. The wood absorbed the chalk and the doors started to look gray!

I also used to climb on a chair and start giving classes to a group of imaginary kids, so I guess at that time, people thought I would be a teacher.

But I was always curious and used to devour any book in my hands. One of my favorite lectures was the Enciclopedia Salvat, which every once in a while they would come out with a new volume that they used to sell at Pueblo Supermarkets, so I would beg my mom to buy one for me. I even memorized the covers of the 12 volumes: the first one had a papyrus fragment of the Egyptian Book of the Dead and the 12th had a NASA picture with the Apolo 13 in space with Earth in the background.

While still in elementary school I began writing science fiction scripts and making cuts out of the fashion and decor magazine my mom used to buy. From that moment on, I gave into the “glossy” and until this day, I’m in love with magazines.

I also had a time in which I wanted to study architecture, but I have to admit that I freaked out over all the things people said about Structure Class. Believe me, numbers and I do not get along.

ME: What did you end up studying in College and why?

University of Puerto Rico (Photo Cred: indicepr.com) 

LVZ: Before starting college, I have to say that I was very involved in the university system since I graduated from University of Puerto Rico’s High School (UHS) and that was a huge privilege and influence in me. Particularly in terms of rounding up my education and afterwards on deciding what I wanted to study since this was the Latin American literature boom and magical realism era. I was getting to know Luis Rafael Sánchez, Magali García Ramis, Gabriel García Márquez, Horacio Quiroga and Alejandro Carpentier. I was sure I was going to choose a career in which I could read and write a lot. I wanted to be a print news journalist because that way people would only recognize my byline, not my face. That’s why I did my bachelors and masters degrees in Journalism at the Public Communication School of the University of Puerto Rico in Río Piedras.

ME: Did you work during college?

LVZ: I had the privilege of having parents that could provide everything for me. I wasn’t rich or anything, but I had the basics, so I was able to focus full-time on school.

ME: What was your first full time job as a journalist?

LVZ: By the end of my bachelors I had a practice course that was supervised by Norma Valle from Imagen Magazine back when Casiano Communications was in charge. I managed to stay there for several years but then I quit to pursue my masters degree. When I graduated they hired me again, but soon I was contacted from El Nuevo Día. I was a little traumatized at first for having to change the glossy paper to a newspaper, but I was very attracted to the journalism challenge of having a daily deadline, something that would require a different work rhythm than I was used to.

That’s how I had the privilege of working as a journalist, in my field of study, since day one.

ME: How did you get your start into the lifestyle and fashion scene?

LVZ: First, I started as a reader. Since I was very young I read a lot of magazines made in Puerto Rico, United States and Europe. In fact, whenever I travel, one of the first things I do is go to a newsstand, get a local newspaper and see what magazines they have, even if I don’t understand the language. This is one of the best ways to train the eye. Not only in terms of topics, but in graphic and design terms. An editor not only works with text and supervising reporters. An editor is in charge of conceptualizing an entire magazine, cover to cover. You must have a much greater vision with your graphic designer and all other artists so your product reflects freshness, innovation and it’s attractive to your audience.

I didn’t end up working at a magazine with strong beauty and fashion content by chance. I looked for it with all my intention.
— Larissa Vázquez Zapata

Larissa with Beyoncé (then pregnant with Blue Ivy) at the launch of one of her perfumes

I didn’t end up working at a magazine with strong beauty and fashion content by chance. I looked for it with all my intention. At that moment it was what I most wanted to do and that’s how I started to get to know people, develop my resources and at the same time, people in the industry started to notice me through my work. And with time, that’s how I started to win the exclusives, big interviews, invitations to cover events around the world and so on.

With more than 20 years as a journalist, with a steady byline and the past 8 years as Editor of Magacín, I’ve developed an expertise in lifestyle topics, luxury marketing and the female audience.

Also in my free time I read a lot of information about lifestyle, because I like it. Apart from fashion and beauty, I read and write a lot about travel, art, design, architecture and gastronomy. Truth be told, part of my job is to be aware of all trends in these topics.

ME: How does it feel to be Editor of one of the best Fashion publications in Puerto Rico?

LVZ: Great! It’s a privilege and a great responsibility. In terms of print only, we are talking about a lifestyle magazine with the most circulation in Puerto Rico. Almost 200,000 copies are inserted in El Nuevo Día every Sunday and Magacin Lifestyle, the magazine we publish in glossy paper every season directed to high income households, has a guaranteed circulation of 30,000 copies.

Magacin Lifestyle print magazine. Read the Summer 2016 issue it here. 

Although for web and social media, that is a whole new world. Now we are not only working with one platform, we have mutated into a monster with several heads. I am responsible for the editorial calendar while creating and executing content strategies for every Magacín platform, among others. But we are also a very small team so we have to be extra efficient.

ME: What do you most like about your career?

Provided Picture 

LVZ: That it demands constant creativity and every day is different. You have the opportunity to get to know extraordinary people, visit new magnificent places, see, listen, smell and appreciate a lot of things first hand. And most importantly, write and being able to tell a story. In the end, it’s the seduction with words, as Álex Grijelmo says.

ME: What is the biggest challenge of your career?

LVZ: Moving at the rhythm of technology, getting to know the audiences better each day and balancing between work and personal life. Anyone who has worked in the communications industry knows that the levels of stress are very high, with super extended hours. In other words:  don't let the job become who you are.

ME: What has been the best moment in your career at Magacín so far?

LVZ: 2008 was very important for me because it was the year that we first published Magacin Lifestyle, which I consider my daughter. Being able to create a product from scratch until having it in your hands is very exciting.

Then in 2011 we became a multi-platform when we launched magacin.com in which I had the opportunity to work on the architecture of the site with my friend Orlando Camperto, which by the way, designed Magacín Lifestyle and now is the Design Director at El Nuevo Día and Primera Hora. I remember how we used to cover the walls with yellow Post-Its in order to visualize the functionalities we wanted the website to have.

These two launches have been the biggest milestones in the history of Magacín and I am very satisfied to know I was the editor during these stages. But as you know, we are moving at the speed of technology and market trends, so soon you will be seeing some changes. I can’t tell you anything else, but we keep evolving and that’s what’s important.

Larissa at the Épernay Vineyards in France, where the Moët & Chandon champagne is made. 

ME: What has been your favorite assignment?

LVZ: During almost more than 20 years working as a journalist it’s probably impossible to remember all of them. I do have special memories for a series of travel chronicles I made through the Middle East in countries like Oman, Qatar, Barein and some of the Arab Emirates like Fujaira, Abu Dabi and Dubai. Those are places that you don’t get to visit every day.

ME: How do you feel you are contributing to the Puerto Rican society?

LVZ: There’s a lot of people who think publications like Magacín are superficial because of its social and lifestyle content. They fail to notice that in 20 years you will be able to know how the economy, fashion and people’s situation was during this time. Magacín is filled with anthropological and social lectures.

From the left: Gustavo Arango, Larissa Vázquez Zapa and Nono Maldonado. (Proviced Picture)

You can figure out what makes a society by carefully studying their lifestyle and how it entertains, among other factors. Magacín is a window to a society sector in Puerto Rico and at the same time, gives you a quick take to the world.

ME: If you weren’t Editor for Magacín, what would you be?

LVZ: An architect or perfumist.

Larissa at the Louis Vuitton Foundation in the outsides of Paris. 

ME: Would you encourage the current generation to pursue journalism as a career?

LVZ: If they have ink in their veins, absolutely! Even though this metaphor is a little out-dated since it refers to traditional print journalism, I like it because it stresses the passion and compromise it requires. Today’s journalism is multitasking. You have to be ready to do everything, but even though the media has changed, the basics are still the same. If you want to be a journalist, you have to understand the ethics, have a profound understanding of your language, develop analysis capabilities and have a great intuition to recognize where’s a story.

Also, remember that journalism doesn’t make anyone rich and the glamour is only a mirage.

If you want to be a journalist, you have to understand the ethics, have a profound understanding of your language, develop analysis capabilities and have a great intuition to recognize where’s a story.
— Larissa Vázquez Zapata

ME: Do you need to study journalism in order to be an Editor?

Behind the Scenes at a Magacín Photoshoot. (Photo Cred: magacin.com)

LVZ: No one would dare ask a surgeon who’s about to do surgery: hey, did you study medicine? Because it’s obvious, we take it for granted. Well Journalism Schools don’t exist by chance. If someone wants to work in the communication industry and be an editor for example, someone who is going to edit and correct what other journalists write, it must be a journalist who supervises you. For the sake of professional respect, someone who knows what the reporter had to go through in order to write that piece. An editor is not an editor because he/ she writes beautifully. An editor is someone who understands much more than just gathering and conceptualizing information.

An editor is not an editor because he/ she writes beautifully. An editor is someone who understands much more than just gathering and conceptualizing information.
— Larissa Vázquez Zapata

The thing is that nowadays there’s a tendency in which any super model, pageant queen or actor who wants to become famous can be given a microphone. And instead of naming them TV Presenters, they call them Journalists. But if the media certifies it, we are doomed. And sadly, TV is filled with cases like these, which harm the profession.

Larissa with Puerto Rican Supermodel Joan Smalls at The Mall of San Juan.

ME: What would you recommend someone who wants to be an Editor of a lifestyle magazine one day?

LVZ: To be up to date, cultivate and get to know every topic that they pretend to cover. That they know how to write, because even if it’s a post on Facebook, a tweet or a caption on Instagram, it has to be well written according to the particularities of each platform. They have to develop a good eye. To learn to work as a team because the newsroom is a work chain.  Enroll in practice courses because that is the best way to network with people in the industry and really know if you like the editorial world.


Larissa's Favorites:

Favorite way to unwind: Sleeping (I really need those extra hours) and reading magazines. I have magazines in every room in my house! I also love spending time with my nephew. I enjoy going out to eat out of town with the family.

Favorite Holiday: None. Every month there’s at least one holiday with questionable origins and there’s no doubt commerce is the one taking advantage of the celebration.

Favorite Social Media: Not too long ago the Sales and Marketing Executives Association of Puerto Rico (SME) presented a study which revealed that 87.7% of the Puerto Rican population prefers Facebook, which is the same tendency we have seen in our followers. So as an editor, I have to be where our audience is. In fact, according to Neiman Lab, 44% of the adult population in the United States access news outlets through Facebook. Which means, we can not leave out Facebook and that Mark Zuckerberg is doing a great job!

Personally as an editor, I use Facebook a lot as, but I prefer my private life to stay private.

Must Have Piece of Clothing: Solid color twin sets, dark jeans and a black lace dress. But the look isn’t complete without a good pair of shoes and I prefer my Tribute T-Strap by Saint Laurent in gold.

Favorite Scent: I can’t choose just one! The first rain drops in soil, white flowers (gardenia, jasmine, nardo and azahar) and the combination of saffron rose and oud.

A necessary luxury: Time above all things. Also perfume, dark chocolate truffles, heels and traveling.

Music Genre: It depends on my mood. What you will never find in my playlist is rap, reggae or reggaeton.

Favorite Book: The Bible. Is the book with the most circulation and the most translated in history. Also Salvadas las distancias: La caverna y Todos los nombres by José Saramago, 100 Years of Solitude and Love in Times of Cholera by Gabriel García Márquez. Reunión de espejos by José Vega (is a story book collection of Puerto Rican writers), and The Perfume by Patrick Süskind.

Must have decor piece: Isamu Noguchi table with a black base.

The Noguchi Coffee Table (Photo Cred: Apartment Therapy)

Favorite Restaurant: Wherever they serve good sushi or Mediterranean cuisine.

Favorite Coffee Shop: Chaguín in Río Piedras beside La Gándara. I don’t even know if it exists anymore, but just for the sake of nostalgia. It used to be the center of encounter of the UPR's Communications School students.

Favorite place you’ve ever visited: Istanbul, Florence and New York are my favorite cities.

Hot air balloons in Capadocia, Turkey. (Photo Cred: Tropdreamer.com)

What is next in your bucket list: 2016 will mark the 20th anniversary since my first trip to Spain so I would love to visit my friends and do a roadtrip along the South once again. Granada blows my mind! Also, my friend Nora and her husband Ettore coordinate an Isabelina route that is historic and fascinating. Then we will eat gazpacho, bulls tail and honey eggplant in Cordoba.

I am also waiting for the opportunity to go see the northern lights, maybe in Tromso, Norway and overfly Capadocia on an air balloon.

But for now, probably a barre workout. Not because I love exercise, but the complete opposite. To see if I start enjoying it a little bit!

 


That's it guys! Hope you really enjoyed this interview. Now that you know Larissa's hard work behind the scenes, make sure you subscribe to magacin.com so you can learn more about the fabulous lifestyle trends in Puerto Rico.  

Who would you like me to interview next? Let me know in the comments bellow. 

Until next time!

María Elena

Career Profile | Patricia de la Torre, Former Editor-In-Chief of Caras Puerto Rico

Career, PopularMaría Elena1 Comment

Patricia de la Torre is the former Editor-In-Chief for Caras Puerto Rico, a magazine that closed its doors after 25 years full of great articles targeted to intelligent and curious women. But her high profile career never went to her head. "I am the person who in the middle of meetings stand ups and looks for coffee for the person I'm meeting with", she expressed with pride. It may be that one of her mentors was the graceful (no pun intended) Grace Mirabella... but we'll get into details about that soon.

Even though you can still tell Patricia misses Caras Magazine since it closed this past winter, she is finding inspiration in her new job at Puerto Rico's Bank of Economic Development, where she feels constantly inspired by upcoming entrepreneurs. "It's kind of weird because in my generation they taught us to think about who would we work for, rather what we were going to do. Since millennials are growing up in such hard times, you've developed business skills and see opportunities in places that maybe our generation doesn't see", she expressed. 

"This job has sparked an illusion in me to search for what I can do and has awaken an entrepreneurial spirit in me", expressed the also owner of Patsee, a handbag brand she hand-makes.  (You can order custom handbags by emailing her at delatorre.patricia@gmail.com)

Interviewing Patricia in the beautiful rooftop at Olive Boutique Hotel, has been one of the highlights of my career since she is not only recognized for her amazing career journey, but for being a strong feminist without losing her charming personality. When I told her about my little dream of being an intern for her during college but I never had the guts to tell her, she immediately started laughing and told me that I should've emailed her. Which made me regret being so shy. So college students, take notes! This is how you make it in the magazine publishing industry:

ME: You have a BA and Masters Degree in fashion?

PT: I did my undergrad in Fashion Merchandising from Marymount College and then I did a Masters Degree in Fashion Retailing at NYU.

ME: Did you always know you wanted to work in the Fashion Industry?

PT: Definitely! When I took off for college, studying fashion was not as popular as it is today. To tell you the truth, it was difficult to find schools with fashion majors. The cool thing about Marmount is that since it was a Liberal Arts School, I had the opportunity of graduating with a minor in Creative Writing.

Then, when I graduated with my bachelors degree I was like "do I really have to go and work now?! How terrible, this can't be happening!". So it was way easier to go ahead and study a Masters Degree instead of just accepting that I had to be an adult. So I enrolled in NYU, which was an spectacular experience... It was right in the city where I always wanted to be. But of course, my parents wouldn't let me go for undergrad... which I think was a good idea because I would've been a major disaster!

ME: Tell me about your internship experiences?

PT: Since during that time, pattern divisions were huge, I worked with Vogue Patterns for a semester in college, which was amazing... it was at Vogue's same building! It was super interesting because in Fashion Merchandising we had to work a lot with seams, pattern making, sizing and so much more. They trained us to be able to choose the best garments by turning clothes inside out in order to actually see what material they were using so you would be prepared to work as a buyer for a store someday. I even took chemistry classes while I did an exchange program in London School of Fashion! It was a required two semester course that taught me to be able to understand textiles.

After that I did an Internship at Mirabella Magazine, which was wonderful! The magazine was directed by Grace Mirabella, former Editor in Chief at Vogue, before Anna Wintour took charge. To this day I still remember how hands on and what a special woman she was. It was a really small staff and she was very involved with everything.

I worked in their closet as the assistant of the assistant of the assistant of the assistant and sometimes I had to wake up at 3am to get to photoshoot after looking for everything that was needed in the office and take it to the van, go to the location and pick up the editors and models. But I still had the opportunity of being with Grace during meetings, while being an intern! She even invited me to some of her events at her beautiful brownstone home in Manhattan with all of her staff. I remember one day I found myself at Grace Mirabella's house with all of these designers and I was like "Oh my God what am I doing here?!". The thing is, this fashion world is a little intense and complicated, and she was a great person.

ME: How did you get these amazing internships?

PT: I feel like these days, finding internships is so much more difficult. In those days it wasn't very common to study fashion, so that's why I think that there were more opportunities. I really don't remember exactly how it happened, but I do remember it was pretty easy. 

ME: Who did you most admire when you were growing up?

PT: My mom. I literally ended up studying fashion because of her... She sacrificed so many things so my sisters and I could have the best dresses and shoes, which I believe is to truly be admired. We were these little schmucks and she would take us to Oui Boutique and Nativa Boutique, because she loved spoiling us. She has impeccable taste and she has a lot of common sense, which are things that have really influenced my sisters and I. 

ME: You mentioned on an interview that you entered the magazine world by accident. Tell me a little bit more about this.

PT: It really was by accident. I studied Fashion Merchandising and Fashion Retailing so I was supposed to be a buyer for some store, but it never happened. But I've always loved writing.

When we were kids we used to visit my dad's family in Spain and he always made us write a paper about our experiences. But not only that! When we came back to Puerto Rico, he would make us write an essay about our trip. He even copied our essays and sent them to our professors and it was horrible! But that made us develop a writing discipline that helped us express our experiences in paper later on. 

That's how I started having an itch to start developing the art of writing and journalism. Then while I was doing my undergrad, I decided to minor in creative writing. And once I entered (the magazine world), I was hooked. 

ME: How was your experience at Imagen?

PT: When I came back to Puerto Rico, I started working as an Assistant Fashion Editor at Imagen, and when the Fashion Editor left, they gave me the position. It was a very interesting experience! I was there for four years and I remember that during that time we didn't use Photoshop. We did everything by hand. One of my mentors was the magazine's photographer at the time, Raul Torres, because he was an artist of airbrushing with just brushes, pencils, erasers and sprays. He did everything by hand! No Photoshop.

ME: You worked for a while at GFR Media's deModa. How was that experience?

When this project started, GFR Media called me to join their team. I started as the Fashion Editor and when the magazine started taking more form and direction, they gave me the opportunity to direct it. I had the experience of seeing how a publication went from a newspaper to a newsstand and this is how my job changed from doing only fashion, to actually creating a magazine from scratch. This was also my first experience directing a magazine, which entails so many other things. You have to be in charge of graphic design, photography, client relationships, editing and everything. Even developing a brand! I stayed there for 8 years. 

ME: How did you take the big leap to Caras?

PT: Marisol Malaret was the Editor in Chief of Caras for many, many years... and when a position opened I got it and stayed there for 13 years. The best thing about Caras was our staff. We had the best journalists, photographers and graphic designers. Everyone went to work with a good mood and giving it their all, because Televisa (the magazine's publishing house) gave us a lot of editorial opportunities. Caras had an international look and feel because it was made for educated women who traveled and wanted to know about everything, but it was still a local magazine. Interviews were local and fashion was local.

It was also very important for us to have a balance between articles of interest and social pages. We wanted to have a complete magazine so that any type of person could find something of interest.  If you wanted to know what was the hottest restaurant not only in Puerto Rico, but in New York or Paris, we had an article about it. If you wanted a travel article we also had it... if you wanted something about art and culture, we also had it. We even had a Hollywood correspondent! 

We had brainstorming meetings where everyone had to bring out a topic no matter if it was from their department or not. It was like gathering with friends... we all had different interests, expertises and points of view. That's how we payed such close attention to editorial content. 

If it's not relevant for readers, it's not relevant for advertisers. A magazine is a business and the only way to make money out of it, is by having a quality product. You can't sell your soul to the devil. The moment to turn your magazine into a commercial product, you're doomed. Your readers and advertisers will leave. In order to make your articles relevant, you need to not make your articles look like a non paid political advertisement. The moment you start selling editorials, you're dead.

ME: What was the hardest part of working for a lifestyle magazine during your 13 years in Caras?

PT: I believe that in general, the media still hasn't found the perfect way to adapt to all the changes happening with the Internet and social media. They are still finding the "perfect" formula of how to work the constant changes in media.

The most important thing to think about is to look at it as a brand. Not a magazine, not a blog, not a newspaper, not a radio program or tv program. For example, Caras Magazine was part of the Caras brand. So Caras was a social event, a trip, a clothing line. Everything has to integrate with the brand and the magazine has to be part of it. There has to be a bigger picture; you need to give the customer a 360 experience... An all inclusive: web, social, events, licenses, franchises. 

ME: I loved that Caras had professional profiles! You once said that "women love knowing about other women's stories" and I totally agree.

PT: Women still have a long way to go in equality when it comes to jobs. I love listening about women who are successful and specially when they form part of board of directors. Important decisions are still, in great majority, in hands of men. In Caras, we did a really great effort to find women who gave us a good story and trust me, there're a lot of them! 

I highly recommend the documentary Miss Representation, which is about women leaders and the importance media has in highlighting women as professionals and as cultural and political leaders. I even had my two boys watch it! 

ME: What is the best memory you have in the industry?

PT: Wow... There's a lot of them. But not too long ago, they called me to talk about fashion history in Puerto Rico for the local documentary film Anatomía de un Vestido and that felt really good! It is a very well made local film by Flora Pérez Garay.

ME: Who's the person you most enjoyed interviewing?

PT: Arnaldo Roche. Even though he's really reserved, he let me come inside his workshop. I felt like he was letting me inside his world, and once that happened, we have developed a really beautiful friendship. It felt like a privilege. 

ME: What advise would you give someone trying to enter the magazine world in 2015?

PT: Learn about everything... you need to know how to do everything. Read, read, read and learn new languages and history. Travel. Be curious, have initiative... All that knowledge you thought you were never going to need will become useful when it comes to have an open mind. Even to engage in conversations with whomever! You always need a good conversation piece.

Random facts about Patricia:

  • Favorite Scent: Musk oil by Kiehls
  • Favorite Music: 80's rock
  • Favorite Book: Everything written by David Sedaris. He's so funny!
  • Favorite way to unwind: With my family and boyfriend (actor Braulio Castillo who she describes as a blessing in her life)
  • Favorite Restaurant: My brother in law's restaurant Bricolage in Brooklyn New York. It's an amazing Vietnamese gastropub. 
  • Favorite Social Media Platform: Instagram
  • Favorite Coffee Shop: Café Cuatro Sombras
  • Favorite Drink: Johnny Walker on the rocks.
  • Most have Home decor piece: Pictures! Of everyone. A home without pictures is not a home.
  • Most have fashion accessories: A good pair of jeans. I can pay anything for a good pair.
  • Most proud of: My two sons.
  • Necessary luxury: A nice trip once a year.
  • What's on the top of your bucket list: A nice getaway! I am dying to visit Turkey.
  • Best place you ever visited: There are so many! But no matter where I am, if I am with my family, it's the best place ever.

As I said before, I feel really honored to have had the opportunity of sharing this interview with you. Patricia is someone that I've admired for so long for her career journey and grace. She never lets the industry get to her. I really wish you find the same lesson I got from this interview: Follow your dreams and surround yourself with loving and talented people. Somehow, the world will conspire in your favor.

Thank you so much to Olive Boutique Hotel in San Juan for giving me the opportunity of interviewing Patricia at their amazing rooftop. Did you know The Real Housewives of Atlanta stayed here during their visit to Puerto Rico?! For more information about bookings visit www.oliveboutiquehotel.com or call 787.705.9994. You won't regret it!